• Despite the postponement of Art Cologne 2020, we are very pleased to present selected works online. Detailed information can be...

    Despite the postponement of Art Cologne 2020, we are very pleased to present selected works online. Detailed information can be found in our viewing room and we are also available for individual consultations.

    Häusler Contemporary Zurich and max goelitz present their collaborative booth for Art Cologne 2020 online with the artists Liz Deschenes, Brigitte Kowanz, Gary Kuehn, Haroon Mirza, David Reed, Keith Sonnier and James Turrell.


    In March of 2020, Häusler Contemporary was reorganized, with long-term director Max Goelitz taking on the leadership of the Munich gallery. The newly named max goelitz gallery retains strong collaborative ties with the Häusler Contemporary Zurich. On the basis of this partnership, a selection of artworks will be presented in the viewing room, represented by both galleries and showing significant works from the 1990s by Gary Kuehn and Keith Sonnier, as well as a new work by James Turrell. The focus of the presentation is a large-format work by David Reed, which was part of his most recent museum exhibitions in Miami and Nuremberg. This year's Art Cologne program is a consistent and contemporary continuation of the longstanding collaborative companionship and gallery work with the artists by Wolfgang Häusler and Max Goelitz.

    • David Reed

      David Reed

    • Keith Sonnier

      Keith Sonnier

    • Liz Deschenes

      Liz Deschenes

    • Brigitte Kowanz

      Brigitte Kowanz

    • James Turrell

      James Turrell

    • Haroon Mirza

      Haroon Mirza

    • Gary Kuehn

      Gary Kuehn

  • David Reed

    Courtesy of Häusler Contemporary
    Photo: NMN (Annette Kradisch)
  • The works of the American abstract painter David Reed (*1946 in San Diego, CA, US) are characterized by powerful gestural...

    The works of the American abstract painter David Reed (*1946 in San Diego, CA, US) are characterized by powerful gestural movements that move across the format like loops or ribbons and are broken up by seemingly randomly arranged color fields. Influenced by Abstract Expressionism on the one hand and the works of Minimalism and Postminimalism on the other, Reed developed his very own pictorial language from 1971 onwards, in which traditional painting techniques are combined with the use of laser-cut stencils produced by means of digital image processing. The various layers of paint in his works are gradually layered on top of each other like foils and polished smooth when dry. As a result, the creative phases of his paintings are often linked to a long and complex technical process, which usually takes several years and is documented by Reed simultaneously in the form of sketches.

     

    Photo: Mischa Scherrer (Häusler Contemporary)

  • David Reed, #659 (Vice and Reflection), 1975/ 1996-2000/ 2007-2011/ 2014-2015/ 2015-2016/ 2016

    David Reed

    #659 (Vice and Reflection), 1975/ 1996-2000/ 2007-2011/ 2014-2015/ 2015-2016/ 2016

    In the mid-1970s, David Reed converted the expressive gesture of the brushstroke into an artificial and highly controlled representation of “the brushstroke”. While in Abstract Expressionism, the visible brushstroke was utilized for the artist's personal introspection, David Reed transformed it into an object of analysis and manipulation. For his solo exhibition at the Pérez Art Museum Miami in 2016, the artist created a four-part series of extraordinarily formatted works, shown for the first time in Europe at the New Museum in Nuremberg last year, presenting associated drawings, color studies and a video film with a manipulated scene from the pilot film for the US television series Miami Vice. The work #659, showing at the fair, is the central work of this series and is characterized by transparent, light surfaces as well as rich yellow and blue tones in connection with striking "brushstroke" elements.

     

    Courtesy of Häusler Contemporary | Photo: NMN (Annette Kadisch)

  • Ausstellungsansicht Vice and Reflection #2, Neues Museum Nürnberg, 2019, Courtesy of Häusler Contemporary | Photo: NMN (Annette Kadisch)

  • David Reed, #665, 2014–2018

    David Reed

    #665, 2014–2018

    In the medium of painting, the artist also reflects on his visual experience with the moving images of television and cinema. With the farsightedness of an intellectual, Reed manages to question the parameters of painting afresh, across the borders of historical period and genre, with John Ford or Alfred Hitchcock playing just as important a role as Piero della Francesca or Peter Paul Rubens. A fellow New York artist once referred to Reed’s work as “Technicolor painting”, a description welcomed by Reed, who realized early on that “the more I think about film, the better my pictures are.”

     

    Courtesy of Häusler Contemporary | Photo: Lance Brewer

    Text: excerpt of the press release of the exhibition Vice and Reflection #2, 2019 at Neues Museum Nürnberg

     

    • David Reed, #735, 2020
      David Reed, #735, 2020
    • David Reed, #732-2, 2020
      David Reed, #732-2, 2020
  • Keith Sonnier

    Photo: Genevieve Hanson
  • The US American artist Keith Sonnier (*1941 in Mamou, Louisiana, US) rose to prominence in the 1960s with works that...

    The US American artist Keith Sonnier (*1941 in Mamou, Louisiana, US) rose to prominence in the 1960s with works that broadened the traditional understanding of sculpture and used everyday materials such as neon tubes, latex, foam or found industrial materials. He belongs to the generation of post-minimalists that includes Gary Kuehn, Eva Hesse, Robert Morris and Richard Serra, and is one of the first and most important artists to discover light as an independent medium. Through his continuous experimentation he creates sculptures and room installations with directly or indirectly illuminated elements. Keith Sonnier was part of the iconic exhibitions "Live in Your Head: When Attitudes Become Form" at the Kunsthalle Bern, 1969 and "Eccentric Abstraction" at the Fischbach Gallery in New York, 1966. In 2018, the Parrish Art Museum and the New Orleans Museum of Art presented comprehensive retrospectives of the artist.

     

    Photo: Caterine Verde

  • Keith Sonnier, Los La Butte, 1994

    Keith Sonnier

    Los La Butte, 1994

    His continuous experimentation with light as an artistic medium resulted in sculptures and room installations with directly or indirectly illuminated elements. In the mid-1990s, Sonnier created his Tidewater Series, illustrating his versatile use of neon tubes. In his work Los La Butte (1994), Sonnier combined a yellow fluorescent tube with metal, fabric and plastic objects. The playful line of the neon tube directly contrasts the objects and packagings found by the artist in the vicinity of his parents' house. The composition of the individual elements, along with the form of presentation on the base, creates a sensual and almost figurative association.

  • Liz Deschenes

    Photo: Dirk Tacke
  • Liz Deschenes

    Liz Deschenes

    Liz Deschenes (*1966) was born in Boston and lives and works in New York. She attended the Rhode Island School of Art and Design, where she initially enrolled in painting, eventually switching to photography and graduating in 1988. In her artistic work, Deschenes confronts the assumptions surrounding photography as a fixed image and extends this traditional view by experimenting with the medium’s properties and possibilities. Her unique photograms are camera-less, long-term exposures on light-sensitive paper. Deschenes also creates sculptural and architectural objects that incorporate both their surroundings and the viewer through reflections.

     

    In Liz Deschenes' work, the profound examination of the history of photography is omnipresent. Her works are related in content to Louis Daguerre, William Henry Fox Talbot and formally to the concept photography of the 1960s, which opened up self-reflexivity for photography. The critical examination of the history of the medium and the resulting new approach have made Liz Deschenes a pioneer in the field of contemporary photography.


    Photo: Stephen Faught, Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York

  • → Viewing room a changing ratio | rosemarie castoro and liz deschenes

  • Liz Deschenes, FPF #1, 2018

    Liz Deschenes

    FPF #1, 2018

    The title FPF #1, of the two-part photograms from the series with the same name, refer to the abbreviation for "frame per foot" and thus to the process of creating the work. Each photogram of the series was exposed for as long as a human foot touched the ground for a single step, the duration varying according to the gait and speed of the walker. Deschenes refers to the measure for image rates "frames per second", which describes the number of individual images of a camera that are taken per time frame. The artist uses analog photographic techniques to examine and visualize time as a physical unit. FPF #1 is a record of the material conditions of their creation. The structure of the surface changes depending on the brightness during the exposure of the photosensitive paper and the intensity of the chemical development. The immediate reality of the photographic process takes the place of a mediating reality - in the form of a motif. The horizontally staggered works have a monochrome mirror-like effect, which, upon closer inspection, reveal a highly individual, sensitive surface: “It changes, it oxidizes, it catches handprints if handled. It is a sensitive, vulnerable material.” Photography is no longer just a momentary snapshot, it is constantly absorbing the influences of its surroundings. FPF #1 should not be seen as classic pictures, but as experiences that are bound to space and time.


    Photo: Dirk Tacke

  • Brigitte Kowanz

    Photo: Anna Lott Donadel (Galerie Krinzinger)
  • For the Austrian artist Brigitte Kowanz (*1957 in Vienna, AT) Light is the primary artistic medium. She continuously examines the...

    For the Austrian artist Brigitte Kowanz (*1957 in Vienna, AT) Light is the primary artistic medium. She continuously examines the different qualities and manifestations of light in objects, installations and spatial interventions using various illuminants. The medium of light is thereby made tangible and treated as an autonomous phenomenon, material and information carrier, thus a metaphor for a search for new forms to portray a visible reality. In her works, political statements and information transference merge with a formal aesthetic to illustrate that light is not only a neutral vehicle for information, but also plays a decisive role in shaping it. Kowanz was awarded the “Große Österreichische Staatspreis” in 2009 and represented Austria at the 57th Venice Biennial in 2017. Since 1997 she has been a tenured professor at the University of Applied Arts in Vienna. In 2020, the Museum Haus Konstruktiv in Zurich is dedicating an expansive solo exhibition to the artist.

     

    Photo: Mato Johannik

  • Brigitte Kowanz, Je suis Charlie 07.01.2015, 2020

    Brigitte Kowanz

    Je suis Charlie 07.01.2015, 2020

    Optically, Je suis Charlie 07.01.2015 is characterized by hand-drawn, sweeping neon lines reminiscent of cables and placed between the mirror and the glass panel. From a close distance, a code is visible on the glass surface, parallel to the neon tube's path. This code is in the tradition of Kowanz's longstanding involvement with the binary Morse Code, which she repeatedly uses as a formal element and carrier of a second level of meaning in her works. In Morse code, Kowanz has set in this work a significant date in contemporary European history: the attack on the editorial office of Charlie Hebdo's in Paris on January 7, 2015. In her works, the artist often refers to various significant dates that were decisive for the supranational unification of present-day Europe or - as in the case of Charlie Hebdo - put it to the test. Against this background, the cable as a link, as means to transfer electricity and data becomes a symbol for the third industrial revolution that began in the 1970s and that accompanied and influenced the different stages of the European Union in many ways.

     

    Photo: Simon Veres

    • Brigitte Kowanz, Opportunity, 2017
      Brigitte Kowanz, Opportunity, 2017
    • Brigitte Kowanz Opportunity 2017 Bko15 Studio Kowanz 2 Web
      Open larger version of image
  • James Turrell

    Courtesy of Häusler Contemporary
    Photo: Florian Holzherr
  • James Turrell (*1943 in Los Angeles, US), one of the most famous representatives of the international art scene, engages in...

    James Turrell (*1943 in Los Angeles, US), one of the most famous representatives of the international art scene, engages in all his works with the many and varied appearances of natural and artificial light. Turrell pushes at the borders of perception: his installations and environments make it possible to experience light as an artistic medium. The rooms are not lit in the traditional sense, rather they are filled with light and colour. In such light spaces the architecture seems dematerialised – plane, colour and space interact so that the viewer is immersed in a mysterious painterly world. The timelessness and fascination of his works are due mainly on the fact that Turrell succeeds in allowing us to experience light directly as a form of reality, without the use of symbolism or pictorial representation.


    After solo exhibitions at the Guggenheim Museum, New York (2013) and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (2014), among others, the artist's most recent comprehensive retrospectives were shown at Museum Frieder Burda in Baden-Baden (2018) and the Museo Jumex, Mexico City (2019).

     

    James Turrell at Roden Crater Arizona © James Turrell. Courtesy of Häusler Contemporary | Photo: Florian Holzherr

     

  • James Turrell, Ahku (The Circular Glass Series), 2020

    James Turrell

    Ahku (The Circular Glass Series), 2020

    Conceived for an everyday architectural environment, these spectacular works from the Circular Glass series enable a visual and sensory experience of light as was previously reserved for larger installations by the artist. The unique pieces in this series are akin to the Small Glass series from 2016, which has attracted great attention from collectors and a broad public. The Circular Glasses too are individually programmed using the latest LED technology. Their physical structure relates to Turrell's Shallow Space Constructions from the late 1960s and early 1970s. The artist thus continues his long-standing exploration of the technological opportunities in relation to sensory perception practices and invites the viewer to a meditative experience.

    Each Circular Glass fascinates by deploying the captivating effect of light on a plane surface. Observing this breathtaking play of light, the two-dimensional plane transforms into an indefinable depth in which the gaze can loose itself. As typical for James Turrell’s work, the Circular Glasses thus challenge the viewers perception of light and space.

    Facing a Circular Glass, the viewer perceives a circular plane of light that, unlike a projection, seems to be dense and permeable at the same time and that changes its colors in a gradual flow. The color gradient is reminiscent of an animated atmospheric painting in which colors drift from the center to the edges. At times, a single blue, green, or purple hue floods the plane before imploding into a different color. A new aura-like circle forms and radiates outwards in different gradations, as the process begins anew. The sheet of glass is set behind a cut-out section of wall but is not level with it: a Small gap remains, a narrow spatial zone that provides an additional dimension of depth. Each of the dominant colors in turn radiates out over the sharp edges of the circular opening and into the environing space, contaminating the walls and floor.

     

    Courtesy of Häusler Contemporary | Photo: Florian Holzherr

  • Haroon Mirza

    Photo: © Haroon Mirza; Courtesy Lisson Gallery
  • The British-Pakistani artist Haroon Mirza (*1977 in London, UK) sees himself first and foremost as a composer: by creating unique...

    The British-Pakistani artist Haroon Mirza (*1977 in London, UK) sees himself first and foremost as a composer: by creating unique instruments made of household electronic items, turntables, records, LEDs, furniture and assembling them with fragments of video footage, pop-culture references to create a distinct body of works that fuses light, sound and objects into a complex sensory experience. His installations ask viewers to reconsider the perceptual distinctions between noise, sound and music, and to question the categorization of cultural and artistic forms. The artist is particularly interested in the relationship between object and exhibition space, referring to Minimal Art in the process. In 2011 Mirza received the Silver Lion Award at the 54th Venice Biennale and in 2014 was awarded the Nam June Paik Art Center Prize. He has had solo exhibitions at the New Museum, New York (2012); Museum Tinguely, Basel, Switzerland (2015); and the Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, Melbourne (2019), among others.

     

    Photo:  Gaia Fugazza | Courtesy of hrm199

    • Haroon Mirza, Droplets (LED Circuit Composition #31), 2020
      Haroon Mirza, Droplets (LED Circuit Composition #31), 2020
    • Haroon Mirza, Spica and Other Stars, 2019
      Haroon Mirza, Spica and Other Stars, 2019
  • Gary Kuehn

    Courtesy of Häusler Contemporary
    Photo: Dirk Tacke
  • Gary Kuehn (*1939, New Jersey, US), whose extensive oeuvre includes sculptures, paintings, collages and drawings, is one of the most...

    Gary Kuehn (*1939, New Jersey, US), whose extensive oeuvre includes sculptures, paintings, collages and drawings, is one of the most famous representatives of ”Process Art“, which radically changed the concept of art in the 1960s. In his sculptures, Kuehn questions the authority of the material and thus explores the field of tension between limitation and freedom. With an enormous sense of materiality and a craftsmanlike knowledge of its properties, it has been simple forms such as circles, squares, and triangles since the beginning of his career that, in conjunction with his interest in craft and industrial materials such as wood, metal, plaster, polyester, Plexiglas, aluminum, and steel, have formed the basis of his artistic investigations. The geometric forms are often exposed to the deforming forces of mass or kinetic energy, spatially displaced, knotted or pushed, whereby Kuehn always generates an emotional value in his formally abstract works. In Europe, Kuehn's works were last shown on the occasion of the two retrospectives at the Galeria d'Arte Moderna e Contemporanea GAMeC Bergamo (2018) and the Kunstmuseum Liechtenstein (2014).

     

    Photo: Andrea Stappert

  • Gary Kuehn, The Sex of Heavenly Bodies, 1996

    Gary Kuehn

    The Sex of Heavenly Bodies, 1996

    The floor sculpture The Sex of Heavenly Bodies (1996) shows an open ring shape, thus exploring the tension between limitation and freedom. Formally, the wooden sculpture, coated with epoxy resin and graphite, ties in with the reduction of Kuehn's early works of Mattress or Melt Pieces from 1965-68. These works were presented on wooden blocks, inherently influencing their shapes. Kuehn borrowed the title from a cultural-anthropological essay by Claude Lévi-Strauss, who wrote about the polarity of sexes of the moon and the sun (Le sexe des astres, 1973). This reference adds an additional level of physicality and emotionality to the formally abstract work.

     

    Courtesy of Häusler Contemporary | Photo: Studio Kuehn

    • Gary Kuehn, Eternal Figures, 1974
      Gary Kuehn, Eternal Figures, 1974
    • Gary Kuehn, Gesture Project, 1970
      Gary Kuehn, Gesture Project, 1970
  • available works

    Photo: Wolfgang Stahl
    • David Reed, #659 (Vice and Reflection), 1975/ 1996-2000/ 2007-2011/ 2014-2015/ 2015-2016/ 2016
      David Reed, #659 (Vice and Reflection), 1975/ 1996-2000/ 2007-2011/ 2014-2015/ 2015-2016/ 2016
    • David Reed, #665, 2014–2018
      David Reed, #665, 2014–2018
    • David Reed, #735, 2020
      David Reed, #735, 2020
    • David Reed, #732-2, 2020
      David Reed, #732-2, 2020
    • Keith Sonnier, Los La Butte, 1994
      Keith Sonnier, Los La Butte, 1994
    • Liz Deschenes, FPF #1, 2018
      Liz Deschenes, FPF #1, 2018
    • Brigitte Kowanz, Je suis Charlie 07.01.2015, 2020
      Brigitte Kowanz, Je suis Charlie 07.01.2015, 2020
    • Brigitte Kowanz, Opportunity, 2017
      Brigitte Kowanz, Opportunity, 2017
    • James Turrell, Ahku (The Circular Glass Series), 2020
      James Turrell, Ahku (The Circular Glass Series), 2020
    • Haroon Mirza, The Virgin Will Keep Rising (LED Circuit Composition #32) 0000, 2020
      Haroon Mirza, The Virgin Will Keep Rising (LED Circuit Composition #32) 0000, 2020
    • Haroon Mirza, Droplets (LED Circuit Composition #31), 2020
      Haroon Mirza, Droplets (LED Circuit Composition #31), 2020
    • Haroon Mirza, Spica and Other Stars, 2019
      Haroon Mirza, Spica and Other Stars, 2019
    • Gary Kuehn, The Sex of Heavenly Bodies, 1996
      Gary Kuehn, The Sex of Heavenly Bodies, 1996
    • Gary Kuehn, Eternal Figures, 1974
      Gary Kuehn, Eternal Figures, 1974
    • Gary Kuehn, Gesture Project, 1970
      Gary Kuehn, Gesture Project, 1970